• goodlatteIt will be really easy to impeach Trump because he is, unfortunately, mentally ill. The reason for impeachment as described in the impeachment laws:
    • Behavior grossly incompatible with the proper function and purpose of the office.
    • Sound familiar? From the president on down the American people (Trump did not win the popular vote) have been complaining about Trump’s gross behavior! It is reported just about every day and night on the news. (ie: “I’ll bomb the hell out of ’em.”)

Here’s how impeachment works:

  • The Chairman of the Judiciary Committee, Bob Goodlatte, R VA, will propose a Resolution calling for the Judiciary Committee to begin a formal inquiry into the issue of impeachment.
  • Click here to email Bob:
  • http://goodlatte.house.gov/contact/contactform.htm?zip5=24001&zip4=
  • Reasons for the impeachment of Trump:
    • Behavior grossly incompatible with the proper function and purpose of the office.
    • Employing the power of the office for an improper purpose or for personal gain.

The impeachment process plays out in Congress and requires critical votes in both the House of Representatives and the Senate. It is often said that the “House impeaches and the Senate convicts,” or not. In essence, the House first decides if there are grounds to impeach the president, and if it does, the Senate holds a formal impeachment trial.

In the House of Representatives

  • The Chairman of the Judiciary Committee will propose a Resolution calling for the Judiciary Committee to begin a formal inquiry into the issue of impeachment.

  • Based on their inquiry, the Judiciary Committee will send another Resolution to the full House stating that impeachment is warranted and why (the Articles of Impeachment), or that impeachment is not called for.

  • The Full House (probably operating under special floor rules set by the House Rules Committee) will debate and vote on each Article of Impeachment.

  • Should any one of the Articles of Impeachment be approved by a simple majority vote, the President will be “impeached.” However, being impeached is sort of like being indicted of a crime. There still has to be a trial, which is where the US Senate comes in.

In the Senate

  • The Articles of Impeachment are received from the House.

  • The Senate formulates rules and procedures for holding a trial.

  • The Senate will meet in private session to debate a verdict.

  • The Senate, in open session, will vote on a verdict. A 2/3 vote of the Senate will result in a conviction.

  • The Senate may also vote (by a simple majority) to prohibit the President from holding any public office in the future.

Impeachable Offenses

Article II, Section 4 of the Constitution says, “The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.”

In his report, Independent Counsel, Starr accuses President Clinton of committing eleven acts for which he could be removed from office by impeachment. Are any of those acts “Treason, Bribery, or other High Crimes and Misdemeanors?” Well, that’s up to the members of the House of Representatives. According to constitutional lawyers, “High Crimes and Misdemeanors” are (1) real criminality — breaking a law; (2) abuses of power; (3) “violation of public trust” as defined by Alexander Hamilton in the Federalist Papers.

In 1970, then-Representative Gerald R. Ford defined impeachable offenses as “whatever a majority of the House of Representatives considers it to be at a given moment in history.” An excellent definition, Mr. Former President. In the past, Congress has issued Articles of Impeachment for acts in three general categories:

  • Behavior grossly incompatible with the proper function and purpose of the office.

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